The Lonesome Changing Room2

/ Contemporary by Angela Li, Hong Kong, 2021







After the huge success of his solo project, Chan Wai Lap has recreated the Lonesome Changing Room 2 at Contemporary by Angela Li. By constructing a changing room-like, private environment within a public spac, Chan invites the audience to reinvestigate the relationship between individuality and the community, in response to the pandemic. The exhibition is an integration of the artist’s research and personal experience, and presents an opportunity for visitors to act as intruders to the artist’s or other people’s privacy, creating an intimate dialogue. Alongside usual objects seen in a changing room, such as lockers and showers, on show will be Chan’s latest series of paintings and installations created in the past year. As soon as the audience step into the space, they discover bits and pieces of Chan’s observation offstage, hence an intimate dialogue with the artist is immediately induced.

After Chan’s outdoor art installation I Will Always Be On Your Side was shown at Tai Kwun, portraying a swimming pool from above, he decides to build another visually contrasting project. “It has been more than a year that no one has been allowed to visit a changing room, and it is very lonely and needs some company,” said Chan. Sending out messages of compassion and playfulness, his extraordinarily delicate drawings are waiting to be discovered amongst objects commonly found in changing rooms, such as shower curtains, lockers and wooden benches, blurring the boundary between personal and public spaces.




























The Lonesome Changing Room

/ Art Central, Hong Kong, 2021







The Lonesome Changing Room by young Hong Kong artist Chan Wai Lap. By constructing a changing room-like, private environment within a public art fair, Chan invites the audience to reinvestigate the relationship between individuality and the community. The solo project is an integration of the artist’s research and personal experience, and presents an opportunity for visitors to act as intruders to the artist’s or other people’s privacy, creating an intimate dialogue. Alongside usual objects seen in a changing room, such as lockers and showers, on show will be Chan’s latest series of paintings and installations created in the past year. As soon as the audiences step into the space, they discover the bits and pieces of Chan’s observation offstage, hence an intimate dialogue with the artist is induced immediately.

















Shining Moment

/ Tang Art Foundation, Hong Kong, 2021







Light, as the origin of vision, brings along shadows and space. The various wavelengths 
light constitute the spectrum and thus colour and reflection. If an artist can express light
freely, there will be great sense of colour, light and shadow and spatial arrangement. In
this exhibition, numerous Hong Kong artists apply their own twist on the theme “shining
moment”. Szelit Cheung is masterful in depicting the passage of light across spaces. Ant
Ngai Wing Lam expresses either a sense of humor or solemnity with the illuminated
characters; Frank Tang presents light realistically by creating movement through
installation art; both Argus Fong and Cheng Hung manipulate the colours of shadow
to create light; the exaggerated, intense contrast of light and darkness in Stanley’s
paintings gives a liveliness that reflects the hustle and bustle of the city.

As a city with scarce land, housing and private spaces are of utter importance to Hong
Kong people. Nevertheless, we treasure open areas in the suburbs as much, especially
during the epidemic and when we wish to escape from the hasty urban life. In response
to this notion of space, Hong Kong artist show particular sensititivity to spatial
arrangements in their works. For example, Kurt Chan is excellent at creating abstract
space on his canvas, liberating from the constraints of physical space through lines,
colors, light and shadow; Wong Shun Yu’s floral paintings present a space with natural
warmth; the far-reaching wilderness in Wong Sze Wai’s works, the vast sky that Wong
Chun Hei looks up at, and the various daily-documentational objects in Chan Wai Lap’s
installation, all refer to the passage of time in an intimate, memorable space.












Now Showing

/ Karin Weber Gallery, Hong Kong, 2020



‘Now Showing,’ a group show by eleven artists. Cinema, the seventh art form as defined by early 20th century Italian film theoretician Ricciotto Canudo, is becoming increasingly relevant with the expanding role of digital media in our lives.

Films entertain, comfort inspire, steer us towards new possibilities and reveal the aspirations of a generation. They may poignantly capture pain and sorrow, reflect bitter realities and sheer hopelessness, whilst at other times letting us escape into fantasy worlds and lighthearted, happy times. The nature of the medium and advancements in technology furnish films with the magic of make believe, creating realities that unfold in front of our very eyes.

The eleven artists participating in ’Now Showing’ have all selected a film they consider the most memorable or meaningful to them, to use as inspiration for a bespoke work of art. Not surprisingly, the film genres covered are extensive, and relate to the artists’ own upbringing, their life experiences and the significant changes that Hong Kong has undergone in recent years. 








The Dimensions of Living: A House is

/ Jockey Club Creative Arts Centre, Hong Kong, 2020





A group of artists, architects and life walkers contemplate and study the possible dimensions of living. How art could intervene in this mundane issue of everyday life? Could art provide "solutions" or something beyond "solutions"? Through the abstraction of the idea of "House", artists, architects, life walkers and students open up dialogues between visual arts, architecture and the art of living, and propose 13 dimensions of living.

<The Dimensions of Living: A House is> showcases 13 “Houses”. They are the artistic exposition of the mundane issues, which in return extend our imagination of the possible everyday life.